book reviews

Multicultural Children’s Book Day Book Reviews

Growing up I always dreamed of traveling around the world and living in Europe. Seeing so many different places and people, listening to different languages and tasting delicious foods from around the world seemed like the perfect adventure. But it wasn’t until I was 20 years old and I left Colombia to study abroad that I …

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Creative Kids Cultural Blog Hop #52 (June 2017) | Multicultural Kid Blogs

Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop #52 (June 2017)

Welcome to the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop! The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place where bloggers can share multicultural activities, crafts, recipes, and musings for our creative kids. We can’t wait to see what you share this time! Created by Frances of Discovering the World through My Son’s Eyes, the blog hop …

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Multicultural STEM for Kids: Asha Loves Science {Book Review}

Multicultural STEM for Kids: Asha Loves Science {Book Review}

During Asian-Pacific Heritage month, Multicultural Kid Blogs is happy to share a wonderful multicultural STEM book that all kids will enjoy! Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Asha Loves Science; however, all opinions are the author’s own. This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, Multicultural Kid Blogs receives a …

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Beyond the Tiger Mom: Interview with Maya Thiagarajan

These days you can find many books about the parenting strengths of one culture over another.  No matter where you are from, many experts would have you believe that someone is always parenting better than you are.  But educator and mom Maya Thiagarajan invites us to do away with these either/or, better/worse paradigms so we …

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Hispanic Heritage: Learning about Immigration through Books

Publisher’s Weekly likens Look Both Ways in the Barrio Blanco, the debut novel of Judith Robbins Ross, to Junie B. Jones/Ramona Quimby if Junie or Ramona had been a Mexican-American girl whose pre-teen concerns included “immigration, culture and language.” It is a good comparison, and I think readers who enjoy those characters will also love Jacinta, whose life takes a major turn when …

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